[time-nuts] Time of death-Again

Marshall Eubanks tme at americafree.tv
Thu Oct 28 14:18:09 EDT 2010


On Oct 28, 2010, at 2:05 PM, Max Robinson wrote:

> How about the crab supernova.
> 

Msec pulsars are much more stable - see http://arxiv.org/pdf/0911.5534 for some comparisons.

Regards
Marshall

> Regards.
> 
> Max.  K 4 O D S.
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> ----- Original Message ----- From: "jimlux" <jimlux at earthlink.net>
> To: "Discussion of precise time and frequency measurement" <time-nuts at febo.com>
> Sent: Thursday, October 28, 2010 8:30 AM
> Subject: Re: [time-nuts] Time of death-Again
> 
> 
>> Steve Rooke wrote:
>>> One thing we should bear in mind that our tombstone timestamp should
>>> have things like the timezone, and calendar in use, references, such
>>> that future people can determine the exact point in time of our death.
>>> In fact, basing the timestamp on some true reference point would
>>> better than about 2000 years after some event happened on earth as
>>> archaeologists from other words coming to the Earth in the future
>>> would be left to figure out this arbitrary time event. I would propose
>>> that we relate the year portion (which is the LSB and most important)
>>> to some celestial event thereby making it possible to document this
>>> easily for future life-forms to determine. The whole year/date thing
>>> really should be made secular as there is no place for religion in the
>>> governance of society.
>>> 
>>> Steve
>> 
>> 
>> Is this not the same problem we all face when specifying an absolute time? Is it TAI? GPS? UTC? etc.
>> 
>> And, then, if you are moving, the local time offsettime  relative to some reference might be different at different times.
>> 
>> I think this is a sort of relativity question, isn't it?  That is, you just have to pick some place/time, and reference everything else to that. So which astronomical event do you want use as your reference (e.g. a T=0 epoch)and is it sufficiently well determined that you can figure it out later?  It's all well and good, for instance, to use noon on January 1st, 1900 or something as your time zero, but that's hardly a universally available reference point.
>> 
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